Project Jukebox

Digital Branch of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Oral History Program
Mary Ann Olympic, Interview 3

Mary Ann Olympic was interviewed on September 12, 2002 by Don Callaway and Bill Schneider in Igiugig, Alaska. In this interview, Mary talks about the effects of changing transportaton for access to subsistence resources with the increased use of All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV's) and snowmachines, observations of climate and environmental changes, and changes in the timing of freeze-up and the coming of winter. She also talks about trapping, hauling wood, and living at Kukaklek Lake. She marks places around Kukaklek Lake on a map and discusses the meaning of the places and placenames. Finally, she shares some old stories about big "monster" pike fish in Battle Lake eating large animals like reindeer.

Digital Asset Information

Archive #: Oral History 2002-26-01

Project: Katmai National Park
Date of Interview: Sep 12, 2002
Narrator(s): Mary Ann Olympic
Interviewer(s): Bill Schneider, Don Callaway
Location of Interview:
Funding Partners:
National Park Service
Alternate Transcripts
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Sections

Don Callaway provides background on the project and the interview

4-wheeler use and transportation

Changes in transportation

Her family's first snow machine

Her first All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV)

Environmental and climate change

Changes in the timing of the first frost and the coming of winter Methods of travel being dependent on the weather Trapping and collecting wood Hauling wood and seasonal access to Kukaklek Lake Identifying places and use areas around Kukaklek Lake on a map Continues Kukaklek Lake map identification Stories about big fish in Big Pike and Battle Lakes eating large animals 4-wheeler route over Kukaklek Lake when the lake is frozen

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Transcript

MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So today is September 12th. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: 2002? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Two. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: 2002. And Don Callaway here, I'm Bill Schneider. And we have the pleasure of once again talking to Mary Olympic. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And thank you for taking time to do this. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Appreciate it. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Good thing you caught me before I took off. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: You're a Kukaklek woman from way back? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, from way back. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And Don, maybe you will start by explaining what we're -- what we're about. MR. DON CALLAWAY: As you know, Mary, we were here in '95 and we talked with you and some of the other elders here, and you talked to us about your life history. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And so forth. And we put that up on Project Jukebox, which you've seen, we brought it back and showed it on the computer. And what's happened since then is that the Regional Advisory Council has a request before it about ATV access into the Park and Preserve. And so the superintendent, Deb Wiggett of Katmai, asked me to do some interviews in Kokhanok to find out about what kind of transportation people use, where do they go, what kind of things they harvest with it. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: These days now, right now? MR. DON CALLAWAY: Right now. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. Right now. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And so we interviewed a number of people in Kokhanok, and then she asked us to do the same thing here in Igiugig. And so far we've talked to Michael Andrew. I guess that's your nephew. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And we talked to Sonny, Georgie Sonny, and we're going to talk to you, and hopefully we'll be able to talk to Dan Salmon later on. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And essentially, we're asking people to tell us about their experience in getting back to Kukaklek, Kukaklek Lake, and some of their analysis of how things have changed in the last 10 years with respect to the climate, the weather, access of fish and game. And we'll take this information and put it into a report. And also, it will be -- form part of additional tapes for the Project Jukebox that you've already seen. Do you want to add anything to that, Bill? MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: I don't think so. But it's good to talk to you because I know that you go back there very frequently. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: For activities. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah.  MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So maybe we should start by asking you what activities do you use your four-wheeler for? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: A four-wheeler? MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: We used to follow that dog team trail to Kukaklek, even Snow-Go, we follow the trail. We used to before 1970, used to trap 1960 to 1970, we used to trapping beaver and stuff like that. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What did you use for transportation in the old days? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: In the old days that's the way it used to be. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And how long would it take to get out to Kukaklek? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I know my dad was used to lots a walker. Sometime he come down, they had a store over there, used to call him Igiugig Trading Post. Sometime he come down from Kukaklek, walk, he go back up round trip, walk. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And how long? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: One day. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Oh, my God. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Sometime he take five dogs, he could carry stuff. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Pack dogs? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Pack. Pack dogs, yeah. One dog, he could carry one case of milk. And one dog would carry one case of food, in a can. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That way he used to carry. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER So then things changed, huh? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, lots changed now, I would say 7, 1970. Yeah. But we still go up there, though. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: When did first snow machine come? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: In 1960. I think '62, I remember my uncle was driving first Snow-Go. He got a machine in the back. He was driving, I like to laugh at him, when he take and stopped, he pumped the gas, had a cache at the cabin for the gas can, that stopped him. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Also, you would run into the house? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Running into the - into the cache, meat cache, yeah. And bump right there and stop. Boys, back there used to laugh at him hard. Yes, when he said I seen Snow-Go. Sometimes - and then sometimes just drive, drive and try and to stop them machines. He would have to run into something to stop. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So when did your family get first snow machine? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I got first snow machine 1965. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Why did you get a snow machine? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I wanted one, I want to go. That's why I get 12 horse from Iliamna, only cost me $600. 12-horse machine. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And where did you want to go? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: To trap, trapping. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And where were you trapping then? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Back there. Behind that little hill up there. Lynx and minks and otter, fox and beaver. Oh, it's all we used to survive for wintertime. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: When you say you were trapping back there, what route did you take? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: What? MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What trail did you take? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Dog team trail, there was some trail, any kind of trail. Usually have to follow that dog team trail. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Why is that? Why would you have to follow that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Because we don't want to ruin the ground. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Oh. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That's why. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Oh. Even with snow machine, huh? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, even snow machine. These days now, you tell the kids and young ones, same reason, don't run into anyplace because the snow machine or Honda ruin the ground. And it will ruin the berries. That's why. It's important for us still. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I don't know about future. We don't know about future. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So when did - when did you get first all-terrain vehicle? Was that three-wheeler or was it something before that? Before three-wheeler was there anything? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Only the three, first number one was three-wheeler. Little one. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Did you get one of those? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Huh-uh. Only I see when ride four-wheeler, I decide to get one. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And when was that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: 19 -- 1971. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Why did you decide to get four-wheeler? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Because I watched the machine riding and decided to go do it. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: But couldn't you use snow machine? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I still both use. Especially only go through - snow machine go through snow when you got snow, wouldn't be hurt by ground without the snow. They don't. With that. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And but why is four-wheeler better when there's no snow? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Because you don't get stuck. Because a Snow-Go can't go without snow, unless you're on wheel. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Now, what did you find when you got your first four-wheeler? How did it change? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Lot. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Lot? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Faster. A lot faster than dog team. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: And what. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And so now you have snow machine and dog team - snow machine and four-wheeler? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Right now I got both. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: When do you use four-wheeler and when do you use snow machine? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: When snow come. When no more snow, four-wheeler. Especially when the ice freeze the lake, you go back and forth on ice. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: With a - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: With wheels. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: With a four-wheeler? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Kokhanok, Newhalen, Nondalton. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: This lady's a traveler. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, with the carnival going on, we like to go. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: I know. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Even though we're still on the other side. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: But we have to follow Levelock trail to (indiscernible.) MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: It's been maybe seven years since we did the first interview with you. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Have you seen changes in - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: -- the environment, in the climate? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yes, many changes. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What do you see? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I think it's my grampa see talk story, write. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What did your grampa see? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: He always talk about future. The future. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: He tell me about in the future, you guys going to start going just sit down and drive. We drive. I don't know how he know. I was thinking about something my grampa said. Really lot change, even the kids change. They don't know nothing now. They are getting lost. That's our fault. Older ones. We think years like that, I think that's why. Kids. Sometime my grandkids ask me about how I go. I - I tell them. When I was kid, I got not much toys. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Some toys? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Only the play canoe in the water, dunking down. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What about changes in the climate? In the weather. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, weather getting change, too. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: How so? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: It looks like to me the months are getting fast. Fall fast, spring fast, summer fast, winter fast. Seem like to me. I think that everything go by too fast. That's why I figure out that way. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Can you explain more what you mean by that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, you always go fast machine for Honda, that's why. Long time ago, slow. Seemed like - I remember what it looked like we had long winter, long spring, long summer, long fall. Seemed like long time. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. And now? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Nowadays, they already, it come the middle of the month, not too long this month. Yeah, my dad and mom used to pick up at fish camp, to fall red fish, get some way up Battle Lake area. After this month, after you start freezing, you know, frost. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That really too fast, there's nothing you can do about it no more. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What about frost? Is frost coming sooner or later now? Or the same - the same? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: The same. This year kind of fast already, frost twice here. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Is that early? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Early. Remember my folks used to be leave for until after middle of this month, to move to go get some red fish. They dry them outside, when you dry. Then go back again. You go back to red fish camp, from fish camp you go back to winter camp. With that, the little motor five-horse Johnson. They do the - they always make the umiak, they call them umiak, almost like canoe, put skin, all kinds of skin, brown bear skin, moose skin together. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What about freeze-up? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: When they freeze up, we stay in the winter camp up there. With reindeer. Even reindeer we have to move more with us. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. But how about freeze-up now compared to freeze-up when you were a girl? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Freeze-up, they stay. After we freeze-up, warm up, we kind of lot changed now. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: How has it changed now? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: It's after, you know, that freeze and warm-up come, these melt back. It's getting funny. Really change. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And how does that affect your transportation? How do you get around? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Most the time wheels. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Most of the time what? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That we use three-wheeler, four-wheeler, Honda. After when the first snow, we used to have Snow-Go, no more snow. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: What I'm trying to ask about is travel with four-wheeler before freeze-up and after freeze-up. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Maybe we have the need before freeze-up, we use them. Even now freeze when we get enough to - MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: -- freeze. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Which is easier to travel with, before freeze-up or after freeze-up with four-wheeler? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: We will change. The same, stay the same. But when they start getting really cold, and they can't start away, they have to warm them up first. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: When it's cold. Yeah. Uh-hum. And when do you start using snow machine? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: '60, '62. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. But to this year or last year or the year before? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Last year, I go until December. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And why was that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Because no snow. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Was that - did that surprise you, or was that normal? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Normal. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Usually you don't get snow until December? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Sometime we have snow in December, it just didn't come, it melt away. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: This winter? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This winter, yeah. I surprise this winter we had snow until April. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: It lasted a long time? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: You mentioning the melting of snow. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: When we get warm weather, east wind always warm, melt everything. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Why is east wind warm? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: It come from the east. That's why. You know. East wind, that's why you call it east wind (indiscernible.) MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: I just wondered why it was a warm wind. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That's the way done, I guess. We got everything, you know. We don't know nothing. And we got now, that's all. That's why I talk to my young ones all the time, there's accident, too. (Indiscernible.) We don't know about it what's going to happen. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Are you still trapping? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I'm done. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: No more? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I do no more trapping. When I stayed with the school job, that was I stop everything, 1970 -- '68. Even I work in the school before (indiscernible.) I was a janitor, I have to go, come back, and go down and clean. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Are you still working school? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I'm done. I retire. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: But you're not trapping now? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Huh-uh. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So when you use your four-wheeler out here towards the park, what activities are you doing? What are you doing out there? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Get some wood. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Get some wood? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: For my - my wood. For a maqi (phonetic.) maqi-wood (phonetic.) I got amukywood, steam bath every night. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Every night. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. Like much. You have to go do it. Until I get old, really old, I will usually do that. I'm stacking wood. I like to get wood since I start job in winter still. I still do. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. How - how far are you going to get wood? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Usually here you see the big hill up there? MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Sometimes behind. I can (indiscernible) driving from Kukaklek, my home, got a lot of dry wood now for steam. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Are you going that far to get wood? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. Sometime I bring some back there. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Let me just have a couple more questions. Are you - how are you carrying that wood? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I've got sleigh going there. If I go with Snow-Go, I tow the sleigh. If I go with the Honda, I use my trailer. That's the only long time ago before we use machine, we used to pack wood. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. Uh-hum. That was hard. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, work hard. Get some wood back and forth. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Uh-hum. Uh-hum. Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That's the only way, no machine, (indiscernible.) You have to pack. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. That's a long way. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I know, but it seems like it's not long to me long time ago. These days now you see more (indiscernible.) Too far. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Don, do you have some questions? MR. DON CALLAWAY: I wasn't quite sure that when you take your four-wheeler to get wood with your trailer, do you go past Peck - Pecks Creek or is it this side of it? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This side. In the summertime. Wintertime you could pass. MR. DON CALLAWAY: You could pass? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Because you would have to look for wood. MR. DON CALLAWAY: I wasn't quite sure that when you take your four-wheeler to get wood with your trailer, do you go past Peck - Pecks Creek or is it this side of it? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This side. In the summertime. Wintertime you could pass. MR. DON CALLAWAY: You could pass? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Because you would have to look for wood. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. In the wintertime in the last five years, have you gone to Kukaklek on your four-wheeler in the last four years - in the last five years? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Still we go up once a year - once a - once a winter it seems like to me, now I'm slow down. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And what would you go up there to do? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Just go up there and see my home. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Go see your home. MR. DON CALLAWAY:And we would like to pull a map out here. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And document exactly where your home is in Kukaklek. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: What - what, is there - do you have a cabin there? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: We used to have cabin, three cabin. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Uh-hum. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: But last month ago helicopter took me up there, look, but everything falling apart. And I took a picture with me digging taiger (phonetic). Little taiger (phonetic) and rest. MR. DON CALLAWAY: So in this home you had, this is where your dad - was a camp for herding reindeer also? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Called Reindeer Station. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Reindeer Station. Okay. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: They are pulling out the map now, take a look at it. Put all these lines on it. And you don't have another colored pen. Do you want a pencil? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I got it. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Do you have one? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This one got a wrong - wrong name to me. This lake. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: The Reindeer Lake? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This used to be called the Reindeer Lake, this one here. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Oh. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: I think we've corrected that on the earlier map. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This used to be called, this lake right there, Big Pike Lake. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Big Pike? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Pike - Pike Lake, yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And then this one here? Right here, or this one? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This one here. Yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: This one here? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This one called the Pecks Creek, and this one called the Olie Creek. It's this down side. MR. DON CALLAWAY: What's that called again? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Olie Creek, it goes through this here, down below. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Olie? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Olie Creek we called them. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Olie. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. All this. And this is Reindeer, used to be Reindeer Lake, that one. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Uh-hum. Okay. Where on Kukaklek Lake is your - your - your land now? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: In there. Inside this land. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Right in here? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Look like mark over here good. You know that little mountain right there. Right there, look like right there, this one, you see that mountain we call 'em Aksovik (phonetic.) MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Say that again, please. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Aksovik (phonetic.) MR. DON CALLAWAY: Is this near Gauppy's cabin? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, Gauppy's cabin here. We put - this used to be our house. My pa was made them house, my Aunt - my Auntie's house, and us. This little bitty site here by the - that we used to pack water from the spring water, other side of the spring waters we build the house. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And that's Gauppy's cabin? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Oh, okay. So you're just a little bit the other side of Gauppy's cabin? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: And how would you get there from Igiugig? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Used to be dog team trail and follow this way, and go down and come back. And then this straight down. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. Could you draw it in green for me? Could you see - see well enough to draw it? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: What? MR. DON CALLAWAY: The - the - draw the dog team trail you first mentioned. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I know that they had a walk trail, too. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Oh, okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This one got little bridge used to be, from the walk to the house, which is not very far from the house. We would use here. And walk trail down. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Could you draw it on the map? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: And this way, you cross this way, this house place, you walk on top, you walk down, and you could walk - walk across Pecks Creek right there, and this Rock - Rocky Point. Walk down in through here. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. Let me just fill that in a little bit so we can see it. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Oh, that way hard. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. And you mentioned another trail? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah, dog team trail. Same, same, but we save some time. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Same. Almost same, yeah. But sometime beside the walk trail. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. This stuff is not very good on this. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. We used to - MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Do you want a pencil? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: We used to go to fishing there summertime. We call this Narrow Cove. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Where was this? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Right in the point, yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: When we go get the red fish, you have to go this way down here, right up there. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Red fish right here? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Red fish, yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Right here? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. And my dad had a little, you know, little mud house. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Uh-huh. A little semi-subterranean dwelling. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Here. And what's that, Nunuqtak (phonetic) and right in there, one trapping cabin. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: And one up here. There's one here, right there. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Right here? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Qayatpizuk (phonetic.) They go trapping along this. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Go all the way around - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Around? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Mary, how about your travels with your four-wheeler now? How do you go? What's the route you follow? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Dog team trail, same. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Same. So you're going - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: We say follow this coast here. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So you're following the coast. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And then heading in to Rocky Point. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: When we freeze, yeah. In the summertime, you don't. Only in wintertime. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Summertime you don't? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Summertime we go up, got no trail for summer. Only wintertime. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Because in the summer - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Summer the Honda can't go up there, you can't cross the Pecks Creek. You could get stuck Pecks Creek. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: So only wintertime. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: So then you go up to the lake? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Then what? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: They just go fish. Sometimes we fish pike here. Pike fish. We got lots of, all kinds of fish in there. They got eel and they got silver salmon here. Silver salmon, trout, sucker. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: And this place is called? This place where you get those fish, what do you call that again? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Silver salmon, trout, suckers, and pike. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. What's the name of that place? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: This place here, Reindeer Lake. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Reindeer Lake? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Okay. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Okay. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: I want to drive in the Wood Creek right there. Old story, got a long time ago story that when you cross, the caribou, fall caribou when you cross this way, get bit by big one. That's why they call them (Native word) we call them, Big Pike Lake. Eat them all. And my dad says reindeer, too, here, this one, when he get up for red fish up here. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Up by Battle Lake? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Up by Battle Lake. Three reindeer swim across this way from here to this site. Big fish ate them all, three of them. Monster fish. MR. DON CALLAWAY: A big fish. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Wow. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: All no more. Whew. That's why tell us not to go in the middle when we go paddle, we have to follow the beach. MR. DON CALLAWAY: Oh. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Your father told you that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Why do you think he told you that? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Because they have to let us know when we was small. We could, like, die, you know, young one, let us know from us, the story, passing to young generation. That's why. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Do you think he was worried about that big fish? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. This year he talking about big fish in there. Betsy - Betsy and my daughter Martha, and berry patch right there, we used to most of the time go pick at the berry patch that time. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: We're looking at Lake Iliamna area, just east? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. They said they see last month ago, there's a big frame outside. Almost look like a sailboat. They go down to the lake. I know that some - some of them get lost, but can't find. Three people lost in there. Didn't even find no skiff. I don't know. They say to come from here and go back up, never make it up back. With Red Lynn type of skiff skiff. (Indiscernible) onto big fish (indiscernible.) MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Well, that's very helpful. Thanks. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Maybe one of the final questions, when you travel with four-wheeler over Kukaklek Lake - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: -- when it's frozen - MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: -- how do you go? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Over the same trail follow the dog team trail to Kukaklek, we had the dog team trail, walk trail, good. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: But do you - do you go across the lake? MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Uh-hum. We walk from here to here, 30 minutes or more. We go. Fast. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Yeah. Yeah. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: That's why I start picking that way, I guess. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Thank you very much. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. MR. BILL SCHNEIDER: Very helpful. MS. MARY OLYMPIC: Yeah. (End of recorded interview.)