Project Jukebox

Digital Branch of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Oral History Program
Carl Lindstedt, Jr.

Carl Lindstedt, Jr. was interviewed on February 5, 2015 by Jan Yaeger in the Seldovia Village Tribe's small conference room in Seldovia, Alaska. In this interview, Carl talks about his father, his fishing, and his role in Seldovia, including owning the Linwood Bar. Carl also talks about his own fishing and memories of growing up in Seldovia, including the boardwalk. swimming hole and beaches, going to school, and some of the old-timers in the community. He also discusses how the community has changed and the arrival of the ferryboat, Tustumena.

Digital Asset Information

Archive #: Oral History 2014-17-10

Project: Seldovia Project Jukebox
Date of Interview: Feb 5, 2015
Narrator(s): Carl Lindstedt, Jr.
Interviewer(s): Jan Yaeger
Transcriber: Joan O'Leary
Location of Interview:
Funding Partners:
Institute of Museum and Library Services, Seldovia Village Tribe
Alternate Transcripts
There is no alternate transcript for this interview.
Slideshow
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Sections

His parents coming to Seldovia

His father's fishing in the Bering Sea

His father's and his own fishing from Seldovia

Family connection to the Linwood Bar

The first arrival of the ferry, "Tustumena", and changes from having regular ferry service

Being a kid in Seldovia, and getting his first bicycle

House he grew up in

Lindstedt Apartments

1964 Alaska Earthquake

Going to school in Seldovia, and construction of the gymnasium

Harvesting clams

Changes in Seldovia

Memories of Henry Erickson, and his father visiting Sweden

Old schooner on Schooner Beach

Old canneries and Squeaky Anderson

Old buildings in Seldovia and their locations and uses

Breaking through the ice on Lake Susan

Swimming hole near Outside Beach

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Transcript

JAN YAEGER: It is Thursday, February 5th of 2015 and this is Jan Yaeger speaking with Mr. Carl Lindstedt in the Conference Room at the Seldovia Conference Center at the Small Conference Room. And this is a recording for the "In Our Words Project" of the Seldovia Village Tribe.

And Mr. Lindstedt, your family has been in Seldovia for quite a long time. Can you talk a little bit about how your family first came here?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Ah, I don’t know exactly. My dad -- he left Sweden when he was 16, I think, and went through Washington and all that and came up here.

He was on a sailing boat, four-masted sailing boat, fishing the Bering Sea. And him and Carl Nordenson, and I think there was a couple others. I can’t think of the names right now. That’s --

And my mother, I don’t know exactly. She was from Washington. She was married before so --

JAN YAEGER: And so did they meet in Washington and then come here?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. She came here. And then she said she came in on a boat and she didn’t want to leave after she seen everything here, so she didn’t leave again.

JAN YAEGER: So she came up with your father?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR .: No. JAN YAEGER: Okay. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: She met my father here.

JAN YAEGER: And do you know how -- what made her come to Seldovia? What inspired her to come here?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Ah, I think there was some people that talked her into it. I don’t know exactly who it was.

JAN YAEGER: And how about your father, how did he get from the Bering Sea to Seldovia?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: He was fishing and there was a big cannery or herring plant up the bay and delivered herring and the bay was full of herring so --

Of course, Seldovia means Herring Bay so. So that’s about what I remember of that.

JAN YAEGER: So you mentioned that he was fishing with Carl Nordenson. Did they leave Sweden together or did they meet here?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I got a picture at home with them both sitting on a schooner. JAN YAEGER: Oh, really. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Did he ever tell you what it was like fishing the Bering Sea in a masted sailing craft?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: He said in the Bering Sea they were fishing for cod by hand. He had --

He said some days you're on the bottom, some days you're on top or in the middle, so you have to find them first.

JAN YAEGER: He had to have been quite a seaman I think to do something like that.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, there wasn’t anything else around really. There was three or four canneries -- yeah, four canneries here, I think, maybe it was five, I don’t know.

And there was lots of people around. Somebody said there was about two thousand people.

JAN YAEGER: And was that year round or was that mostly during the fishing season?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Mostly during the fishing. People would come in and, of course, they thought they lived there, so I don’t know.

JAN YAEGER: And then when your family was here, what did your parents do?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: My dad worked in the store and fished in the summer. And I went out with him a few times when I was too small.

JAN YAEGER: Oh, really.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. And -- but the last time I think he went fishing he was going up the Inlet (Cook Inlet) and he asked me if I wanted to go and I said no.

And he got back and all the boat and exhaust and everything were just white from salt. So they had a nasty trip. So that was his end of going up the Inlet.

JAN YAEGER: What store did he work in?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Mercantile? Yeah, it was -- Well, it was probably the only store here, but --

JAN YAEGER: And then did he have his own fishing boat or did he fish for someone else?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, he had his own fishing boat.

JAN YAEGER: What was the name?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Daisy L. JAN YAEGER: The Daisy L?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Uh-huh. That's my mother’s name so -- I seen a picture of it in Anchorage sitting on a wall. It was on a grid.

I said where'd they get that? Where that -- Must've been from Fairbanks or some place. It's out there some place. That’s all I can say about that.

JAN YAEGER: Yeah. So what happened to the Daisy L when he finished -- when he stopped fishing?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It started to leak one year down here. It was a few years. My dad hadn’t finished it -- or fished it and it started to leak a little bit. I just took it across the bay over there.

JAN YAEGER: So it's still there some where under water?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I think the -- it's pretty much eaten up.

JAN YAEGER: And you mentioned you fished also, right? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Huh? JAN YAEGER: You fished also, is that right? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: What kind of fishing did you do? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Salmon. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That’s all behind me. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: There’s no more of them. Not many fish around because the regulations and policies.

JAN YAEGER: And did you have your own boat also? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Uh-huh. Yeah, yeah.

JAN YAEGER: And which boat was that?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Tammy L. JAN YAEGER: The L for Lindstedt, I assume? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Uh-huh. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That was my daughter.

JAN YAEGER: And, of course, the Linwood Bar is partially from the Lindstedt name. Can you talk a little bit about that?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I don’t know much about that. That was done before I was around or thought about it.

Him and a guy named Wood that lived down around town here bought it, I guess. Then Shorty Bailey had it when I was growing up, so --

JAN YAEGER: But it's always stayed the Linwood, right? The name I think has stayed the same?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. It's still the same.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. But I assume the building that we know as the Linwood now isn’t the same building that your family had?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: There's -- There was -- everything was -- had to be tore down and moved out and --

JAN YAEGER: Yeah. Is the location close or was it was in another place?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Um, I'd have to think about that.

JAN YAEGER: Okay. Was it on the boardwalk?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, it was on the boardwalk. Not too far from -- I just have to think. I go by where the breakwater is. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That goes out and that was covered up rocks that were down in front of the store so, yeah, it's a little off, but it's there.

JAN YAEGER: Now you mentioned to me that you remember the first time the "Tustumena" came into town.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. JAN YAEGER: Can you talk about what that was like having the ferry start serving Seldovia?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, that was quite a few people down here watching it come in. There was a silly politician on there and he decided to honk the horn lots and they had to cut him off. They wanted to reverse.

So, other than that, you know, you could walk up to the boat and say hi. And you could even go aboard. Now you can’t even get near it.

JAN YAEGER: Did it change life in Seldovia at all, having that regular ferry service?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It used to be once a week, I think. I think it was once or -- you know, pretty much once or twice a week.

JAN YAEGER: For the "Tustumena" or -- or before that?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It's "Tustumena." I don’t think they had another ferry built by then.

JAN YAEGER: When the "Tustumena" started coming on a regular basis, did that change things at all in town?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. Yeah. Well, everything here was shutting down, so, yeah, it helped. If you have a house to build or something, they'd haul.

Since the old sawmill, which was up the bay or up the bay -- up the slough, built all the stuff that was, you know, for canneries and all that stuff and houses. You needed timbers or 2 x 4s or whatever to build a house.

JAN YAEGER: So if you needed lumber, would you go to the sawmill and order the sizes that you needed or how would that work?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. Used to play around it. JAN YAEGER: At the -- by the --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Sawdust piles. JAN YAEGER: Oh, really.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. We would get chased out and we’d end up back there again.

JAN YAEGER: Do you remember who ran the sawmill when you were a kid?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I'd have to think about that. I remember the guy, but can’t think of his name.

JAN YAEGER: What were some of the other things that you did when you were a kid for fun in Seldovia?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, geez. It was a great day when I got a bicycle.

JAN YAEGER: Oh, I bet.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, there wasn’t many roads, but there was the boardwalk. It was one end of town to (pwhish) and we had a ball.

Except one time I was going down the boardwalk and there was a whole mess of people. I guess all the cannery people and everybody was going some place.

I ran into the -- the guy that used to run the power plant and I ran into him, literally. I don’t know -- I just remember that. I just don’t -- that comes back every time I think of that.

JAN YAEGER: Would you say Seldovia was a pretty good place to be a kid?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. Yeah, we’d go down the -- over the bridge, catch king or dog salmon and we just had a ball doing that.

Then we took a skiff on Halloween and put it up on the walkway to the school -- the old school that was there.

JAN YAEGER: And did you get caught or did they even --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, we didn’t get caught, but somebody had taken the principal’s Volkswagen and stuck it on top of the gym. JAN YAEGER: Oh, really.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I don’t know how they got it up there.

JAN YAEGER: That was the same Halloween? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Uh-huh. JAN YAEGER: Oh, my.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: So they were probably pretty much thinking about the car instead of -- Yeah, that was kind of fun.

JAN YAEGER: I would think it would take some talent to get away with things in Seldovia?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah, there wasn’t any harm to anybody, or -- Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: And so how did they get the principal’s Volkswagen down off the roof?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, well, that was -- there was a bunch of those people I don’t know. All the high schoolers and --

JAN YAEGER: I'm sure the statute of limitations has passed by now, so --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, he got the car back in one piece.

And the other time, he had it down by the post office. He went in to get his mail and somebody lifted it up and stuck it so the wheels weren’t touching and that was another one.

JAN YAEGER: Was that one of the little -- the Volkswagen Beetles or -- ?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Beetle, yeah. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

Probably weren’t too many cars in town then I would suspect?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, that was -- Well, when I was growing up there wasn’t -- when I was a little kid there wasn’t any cars.

And they catch a bear on Cap’s Hill. JAN YAEGER: Oh, really?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And lasso him and they -- About, oh, let’s see, four or five people. See 'em walking over the hill by my place with the bear. The bear was walking right with them. JAN YAEGER: Really.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I guess he didn’t -- he knew he was caught. So that's how we got the bears off.

JAN YAEGER: And what did they do with the bear?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I think they -- I didn’t really hear, so I'm pretty sure they let it go or gave it to somebody to eat or whatever. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: But --

JAN YAEGER: So when you were a kid, did you live on the boardwalk or nearby or out of town or -- ?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No. There was, you know, where Gerry stays now? JAN YAEGER: Gerry? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Patrick. JAN YAEGER: Oh, okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: You know, where she stays? JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That used to be my (inaudible) house? JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And there was a red house there. I think it was red, yeah. My dad brought it from, oh, geez, Red Mountain or that area or some place up there.

They tore it down and he brought it to here and built it back up again.

JAN YAEGER: So was it maybe one from some of the mining camps?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, I guess it was from the mining areas.

JAN YAEGER: And then your family used that house, also?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, that’s what he built it for. But that was the easiest way to him to get a house. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: So, lived in that for quite a few years.

JAN YAEGER: Do you have brothers and sisters?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I got -- I -- let’s see, I got a brother. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: He’s in Arizona or some place like that. And the others were Camerons and that was my mother’s first children.

Oh, Vicky Jean and Kelly, she's still -- still down in Washington. I talk to her every once in a while.

JAN YAEGER: And then have you lived in Seldovia your whole life?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. Other than a few days in the Service.

JAN YAEGER: Can you talk a little bit more about the -- the housing that your family had? The people call them the Lindstedt Apartments. I don’t know if it was apartments or free standing houses or -- ?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: There was six apartments down there by about where the drive is -- drive in -- JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: -- to the Lake Terrace. That’s -- there were six -- the building was six apartments in it.

JAN YAEGER: And that's something that your family -- family built?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: My dad built it, yeah. I pounded a few nails in it.

JAN YAEGER: And that was kind of used as senior housing in a way, wasn’t it?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Huh? JAN YAEGER: Was that kind of used as senior housing or were people of all ages there?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Ah, there was six people in there. I don’t know exactly -- old Henry Erickson -- or that was a different person.

I'd have to think about it to get those names right, but they were nice people.

JAN YAEGER: And I've been told your family kind of helped take care of them to some degree, is that right?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: The what? JAN YAEGER: I've been told that your family kind of helped take care of them, make sure that everyone was okay? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Keep an eye on folks and --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yep.

JAN YAEGER: What about the earthquake? Were you here for that? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah.

JAN YAEGER: What was that like?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Ah, rolly. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It -- my dad felt it coming on. He said we better go outdoors right now. And went out there and then it really let loose.

We had about that much ice underneath. It was cracking.

JAN YAEGER: About a foot of ice? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Huh?

JAN YAEGER: About ten inches of ice or a foot of ice? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Just on the ground or on the -- CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: On the ground. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It was just snowing and ice. We had lots of snow and ice. I could just see the hills rolling. Just like kicking a blanket when you're going like that. It -- rolling.

You could see all the trees and everything rolling and God, that was a nasty.

But every turned out all right. Here anyway.

But all the boats and that -- I think Frank Tennison he had a boat down there. It wasn’t working and the rest of them were trying to get out of the harbor in case there was a tidal wave.

I went down to the bridge and timed it. Water coming in and water going out. It took 45 minutes for a very big minus tide and then there would be up to 20 some feet.

JAN YAEGER: Oh, my goodness.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, it was over -- it was about 25, four, five feet or something like that, 20. And it stayed like that for a long time.

JAN YAEGER: How long was it before you started hearing news in Seldovia about what had happened in the rest of Alaska?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: The rest of Alaska? JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: On the radio.

JAN YAEGER: So you could hear radio reports pretty quickly?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Well, I wasn’t -- thinking of that, but mostly around here. ‘Cause all the businesses were getting flooded and all that.

When I did hear it, and -- it have to be a few days or so long before you really hear what happened. I didn’t really know.

I figured there had to be some earthquake and tsunami that was down around the corner in Kodiak. And I didn’t want to be there. JAN YAEGER: No. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No.

JAN YAEGER: What about going to school in Seldovia? What was that like?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It was all right. Everybody walked to school. There wasn’t any riding, no buses around.

Get a bunch of us together and we just walked to school.

JAN YAEGER: And that was in the school that was close to the shop building now, right? It's not there any longer, I know.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No. It's -- The gymnasium or the wood shop. It was off just -- Gosh, we ran between it.

I just don’t -- maybe 20 feet or 25 feet and you bumped the school building and bumped the gym, so it wasn’t that far apart. And the tree is still there.

JAN YAEGER: The tree?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, a tree that was outside the school. It's probably about so big around now. And the steps are right there.

JAN YAEGER: I've heard the steps are there. I still haven’t gone to go find them.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, that’s not hard.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. The gymnasium I think was built maybe about 1956 or ’57, somewhere around there?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: '56.

JAN YAEGER: Does that sound close enough?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I was born in ’46.

JAN YAEGER: So when you first went to school, was the gymnasium there, do you remember?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, it wasn’t there. JAN YAEGER: Yeah. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I was there when it got built.

JAN YAEGER: So that's what I am trying to figure out, is about what year that was.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I don’t know. The politicians and everything come down. You know, the good politicians then.

They just -- pretty soon they just started building and built it up. But I can’t say exactly what year it was. Might be that.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. Who were some of the other people that you remember from Seldovia? Who -- Nick Hogenson? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Can you tell me about him a little bit?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, what’s there to know?

JAN YAEGER: What was he like? What did he do?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, he was a nice guy. He was real nice. We’d go out and have our parties once in a while.

That's another thing, that right across this bay everybody'd go over there and get their clams. JAN YAEGER: Over at Hoen’s Lagoon?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: You could get bags and bags. I mean hundred pound big bags. There was just clams all over. After that quake, nothing.

JAN YAEGER: Really? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Nothing.

JAN YAEGER: Was that pretty immediate?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: This dirt filled over. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And it covered up all the clams. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: There was clams there and up the bay and all over. I liked that.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. Other people would get this kind of year round whenever there was a low tide?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, well, winter was when you had the bigger tides. But they kind of don’t want a red tide to come along and kill you off.

You know, there wasn’t that many -- there was one doctor in town. I remember getting a can of salmon from somebody and my mother was eating it when I got home.

The only one didn’t eat was my dad, I think. I just eat one bite -- just a little bite and yeah, that was pretty good.

That night everybody was sick. The fish was spoiled in the can, but there wasn’t any medicine anywhere around.

A good thing it wasn’t full blown stuff. It turned out all right.

JAN YAEGER: Did your family do a lot of canning and that type of thing, put up food for the winter?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, not really.

JAN YAEGER: More just kind of relied on what was in the stores in the wintertime and so on?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. Get bacon out from outside, and notice a little mold on it, cut the mold off and you still have your bacon. So that was pretty much it.

JAN YAEGER: What are some of the other changes that you have seen in Seldovia? I mean, I know it's a lot smaller now than it used to be, but --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: All the canneries gone and there's no work for anybody, so that’s it.

And it’ll stay like that unless somebody comes up with something. Well, I don’t know.

JAN YAEGER: What about the logging? When that came in, how did that change things? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Logging? JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That was up the bay, you mean?

JAN YAEGER: Anywhere around here.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I don’t really know. There was a few people, maybe three or four, you know, but I didn’t pay much attention to it.

JAN YAEGER: Were there local people that you fished with on your crew?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, pretty much. There's --

JAN YAEGER: And were you seining or gillnetting or -- ?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Ah, seining. At least there was somebody working around. But then it got dried up, too.

So, unless they get something going here. I’ll be here though.

JAN YAEGER: Never thought of going anywhere else?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, I listen to all the Anchorage -- God, I wouldn’t want to live there. Just visit.

JAN YAEGER: What about -- are there things that feel the same to you in Seldovia when you were kids -- some things that seem kind of unchanging?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: There’s -- everything has changed. Not the same.

Just take it as it comes. I don’t like it, but that's the way it is. Oh, yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Anything else you’d like to share with us today? Memories or people that you remember or different events or anything?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Henry Erickson. He -- I think he was on the boat with my dad, and Carl Nordenson, all them were, I think, on the boats. They -- he used to make shoes.

JAN YAEGER: Really? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, he'd -- you could have trouble with your shoes, he’d fix them for you. He was deaf.

JAN YAEGER: You said his name was Henry Erickson? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Uh-huh.

JAN YAEGER: And he came from Sweden, also?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I think he was that. Either that or Norwegian. I don’t know. I think it was Sweden. He went to Hawaii and passed away there.

JAN YAEGER: Do you know, did your dad ever go back to Sweden to visit or anything?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, he did. He went back there and visited all the relatives. I got a book home that's all the relatives in. I never met them, but --

JAN YAEGER: One other thing that I've always been curious about is the old schooner on Schooner Beach. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, that was --

JAN YAEGER: Do you remember when that was a little more intact than it is now? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I pulled out one of its, like, you’d say nails, but it was a spike about that long. Wood.

JAN YAEGER: About sixteen inches. And it was wood? Not metal?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, that's what it was put together with. JAN YAEGER: Wow.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I remember taking it out for school. I think one of the teachers grabbed it and that was the last I seen of that.

JAN YAEGER: Oh, really. Became part of the teacher’s collection then. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And that was about it.

JAN YAEGER: I’ve heard that was kind of a -- sort of like a playground or a jungle gym for kids when it was -- CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Did you play on that?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. I was up on -- up on that. There wasn’t that much -- JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: -- left.

JAN YAEGER: Okay. You couldn’t still go inside or anything? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No. JAN YAEGER: They weren’t --

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It wasn’t, you know, it was just on the beach. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Rottin’ away, so -- It lasted quite a few years.

JAN YAEGER: Yeah, I'm still surprised how much is sitting there -- CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Huh.

JAN YAEGER: -- after so many decades. And that’s the only wreck that I’m aware of that sat right on the beach for very long.

It seems like there have been a few others, but they were salvaged pretty quickly.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Did you ever notice all those piling or are they all eaten up?

JAN YAEGER: On that beach? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Yeah, they’re still there.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, that’s where the canneries -- JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: -- ran way out.

JAN YAEGER: Yeah. And I know, we have -- in the museum, we have a lot of bottles that were pulled from the water around there.

Did you ever find things washed up on the beach?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Were they beer bottles? JAN YAEGER: All kinds of bottles.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: ‘Cause that’s where they used to go was right down on the beach.

JAN YAEGER: Did you ever find things washed up when you were a kid over there?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: We ran down there. I pretty much ran down there to the cannery and snuck out on the dock and did the fishing there.

JAN YAEGER: Oh, okay. So that cannery was still standing there? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: No, AYR. JAN YAEGER: AYR was over there? Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Squeaky’s and they had the shrimp plant down there and crab plant and all that stuff. I was just fishing herring and fishing cods, trout and --

JAN YAEGER: Did you know Squeaky Anderson?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I think I might have known him when I was around -- when you're a little kid, you know, you don’t think of those people. JAN YAEGER: Right. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: But --

JAN YAEGER: I was just wondering which cannery was his. I’ve asked a couple people, but they haven’t been sure what the name of his cannery was.

I think everyone just called it Squeaky’s.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. I don’t know, APA was I think -- I’m not sure exactly.

JAN YAEGER: And one other thing that I’ve been wondering. There used to be a building about where the city multi-purpose building is now that was the old, old school. And then I think it became the library, and I think Jack English had his offices there for a while.

And I've been trying to figure out if that building lasted until the earthquake or if it was torn down before? Does that -- and I think the library was in there. CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Um --

JAN YAEGER: Does that building -- is that familiar to you at all?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Library? No, there used to be a -- I'm just trying to think of the buildings now. Ah, Mrs. English had a books and all that stuff in there. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And then the other half of the building they used for dancing and all that goofy stuff. And then up from that was the fire department, which was pretty tall.

JAN YAEGER: Was that that real tall, narrow tower that I see in pictures? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yep. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That was for raising their hoses up. And then there was the jailhouse after -- right before, they didn’t have a real jailhouse.

They built a little box and put some guy in it and they’re in jail, but they don’t do that much any more. The weather's changed and everything around here. JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, gosh, we used to -- it would freeze and we’d go just about skating. We’d all go down there in the lake.

JAN YAEGER: On Lake Susan?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. And all -- that place was just full.

And one year it -- I didn’t go down there that day, but people came up and got my dad’s ladder and they would run back down there. And it was about four feet thick and it busted. JAN YAEGER: Really?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah, and there was three people went in the drink. I don’t know if he was cop then or what. He dove under the ice and pulled a woman out that he knew.

That would have been -- that's -- and you can still see some -- oh, some coats and stuff way down the ice next time we went down there, but it was a long ways down.

JAN YAEGER: It's real deep? Lake Susan or -- ?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Well, they haven’t really found the bottom yet. JAN YAEGER: Oh, really?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: It’s dirt and all that moss, but the pipes still keep going down.

JAN YAEGER: Huh, so it's real soft? The bottom?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah. There's something down there, but -- JAN YAEGER: But it’s a long way? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: So did they get everybody out who fell through?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, yeah. They got everybody out.

JAN YAEGER: And your house was nearby? That’s why they came for the ladder there?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: They come up and got the ladder and took off for the, but -- I used to know the names who, I just can’t remember.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. And then there was a swimming hole close to Outside Beach, wasn’t there?

Before the earthquake I was told that that little kind of -- it's now it's more of a lagoon and, you know, the saltwater comes in, but that used to be a swimming hole, wasn’t it?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: That didn’t have any seawater going in there.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. Before the earthquake, it didn’t? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Yeah.

JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh. So did you use to swim there?

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Oh, some people would usually go in there and swim and -- JAN YAEGER: Uh-huh.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: And they’d say, oh don’t go out to there -- that -- there's a deep hole there. Not me. Oh, I don’t know.

JAN YAEGER: You didn’t go to the deep part or you did? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: Huh?

JAN YAEGER: You did go to the deep part? CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I didn’t go. JAN YAEGER: Okay.

CARL LINDSTEDT, JR.: I didn’t go. I started to think of something else. I don’t know. That’s all I can think of.

JAN YAEGER: All right. Well, I sure appreciate you coming in today.