Video, Page 1 of 2
Below are video segments from the documentary "Satellite House Call".
Go to Page 1 to view segments 1 - 10, and Go to Page 2 to view segments 11 - 18.

"Satellite House Call"

This film was made to report on the results of an experimental satellite radio project conducted in 1971 and 1972 in interior Alaska that was funded by the National Library of Medicine. It highlights the improved radio communication provided by the ATS-1 satellite system compared with the existing single-side band, high frequency radios. It shows health aides and doctors using the system, and emphasizes the need for and benefit of more dependable communication in rural Alaska, especially for healthcare. The film demonstrates the success of the experimental satellite system and presses for installation of a permanent system.

The film is narrated by Willie Hensley; was directed, filmed and edited by Judy Irving; and was a production of Stanford University's Communication Department. The film was supported by Contract No: NIH71-4718 along with the Lister Hill Center for Biomedical Communication, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institute of Health, and the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare. This video copy was provided by Paul Sherry, Chief Executive Officer, Alaska Tribal Health Consortium.

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Segment #1: An elder in a rural Alaska community using satellite communications to talk to her husband while he is at a health clinic located in the city. Quicktime (1.7 M) | Quicktime older version (2.7 M)
Segment #2: Title of the documentary while showing scenes of an Alaska Native village during the winter season.Quicktime (1.7 M) | Quicktime older version (2 M)
Segment #3: Highlights the traditional subsistence lifestyle of Alaska Native people, and the need for communication technology. Quicktime (1.6 M) | Quicktime older version. (2 M)
Segment #4: How satellite communication is used to improve health care services within Alaskan Native villages. Quicktime (1.2 M) | Quicktime older version. (1.5 M)
Segment #5: Satellite communication systems are managed by the staff of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute. Quicktime (1.3 M) | Quicktime older version. (1 M)
Segment #6: Satellite communication used to transfer various messages between communities, from health care to emergency services. Quicktime (1.6 M) | Quicktime older version. (1.8 M)
Segment #7: The benefits of satellite communication is to be able to regularly communicate with a medical doctor. Bertha Moses, a health aide from Allakaket, and Dr. Bob Cooks, from the hospital in Tanana, share their positive experiences. Quicktime (2.3 M) | Quicktime older version. (3 M)
Segment #8: Bertha Moses is the only health care provider in Allakaket, with the doctor visiting the village once or twice a year. Using satellite communication has helped her to evaluate medical conditions and communicate with other health aides and the doctor on a regular basis. Quicktime (1.9 M) | Quicktime older version. (2.4 M)
Segment #9: The benefits of satellite communication for providing regular health care services to remote communities. Quicktime (1 M) | Quicktime older version. (1.4 M)
Segment #10: Patients from remote communities must be transported by airplane or helicopter to a hospital. Medical supplies and other supplies are also delivered by airplane or helicopter. Quicktime (2.2 M) | Quicktime older version. (2.8 M)